09.14.20

Eton Grundig FR200 Emergency Radio (Shortwave Receiver)

This radio came out in 2002, and was marketed for use in blackouts and other disasters. It covers AM, FM, and shortwave broadcast bands. They were about $40 back in the day. It’s been discontinued, but you can find one on Ebay for $25-$30.

The main useful feature of this radio is a hand-crank battery charger for the radio’s replaceable NiMh battery pack. Turn the crank for a couple minutes, and you’ll get about an hour’s worth of listening. You can also run it off regular AA batteries or an AC adapter. This is a cheap portable with very good sensitivity that is simple to use, and has longer battery life than many other portables.

Before you buy that Baofeng that everyone except the guy who’s been writing about radio and self-reliance for 30+ years (me) says you should get, you should buy an FR200 or something similar. Scratch that. Go on Ebay and buy an FR200. When you as a beginner buy a Baofeng, or any other ham rig for that matter, unless you have a ham license and a local segment of the community to talk with, the thing will get placed on a shelf and never used. Unless there’s some ARES, RACES, or Skywarn activity going on, Amateur Radio conversations on FM VHF and UHF are pretty boring, and nothing most people will want to hear. You might have a local police or fire department that still uses an analog VHF-high band or UHF communications system, and can use that Baofeng as a scanner, but otherwise it’ll just sit there unused. The FR200 is something that you will be able to use every day to get broadcasts from around the globe, and expand the variety of your information collection (intelligence) activities to get a more accurate picture of what’s going on out there.

I recommend the FR200 over other receivers in its class for a couple reasons. It’s simple to operate. Turn it on, adjust the volume, select the band, and start spinning the dial until you hear something. Anyone, not just a radio communications hobbyist, can use the thing. Other radios are more complicated. It also can be just left on a shelf until needed, and still be operational. If the AA batteries in the unit are dead, turn the hand crank for a couple minutes and you’ll be up and running. Not that you should just leave it on a shelf in the first place. You should spend a little time each evening cruising the bands and getting information regardless of what’s going on outside.