04.5.20

A Connecticut Yankee Talks About COVID-19 – #3 – Guns and Police Scanners

Guns

It comes as no surprise that gun and ammunition sales are up. Here in Connecticut, potential first-time owners are stymied because of a combination of shutdowns and the requirement to first possess a permit in order to exercise a fundamental civil right. So, for those of you who up until now didn’t think you needed a gun, and can’t get one because the process to get a Certificate of Eligibility is on hold, remember that come Election Day.

For the rest of you, I’m going to assume you have not owned a firearm before, and just want to get something for a little piece of mind. Congratulations, you have made a step towards self-reliance, preparedness, and self-determination. Now under normal circumstances, I’d tell you to start with a handgun, and get some training in how to use it for self-defense. However, in many places, handguns are more difficult to rapidly acquire compared to long guns (ie. rifles and shotguns), and require time to become proficient in their use. Long guns, especially in the Northeast, have less restrictions on purchase and/or ownership, and are easier to learn how to safely handle and shoot well.

https://www.stoegerindustries.com/side-by-side-shotguns

My recommendation is to get a shotgun, specifically a short, double-barrel side-by-side known as a Coach Gun. If you are of smaller stature, get a 20 gauge, otherwise go with 12 gauge. For ammunition, get a few boxes of buckshot. You are set. In most states, you can simply walk in, buy a shotgun, and leave with it that day assuming your background check goes through OK.

This is probably the safest, most effective home defense firearm for a beginner. It is very easy to check its status (loaded/unloaded) and make safe. Open it up, and look at the chambers. You will either see two shells in them, or not. Since you are a novice, you will want to keep it unloaded until you need to use it, in which case, it only takes a second to insert two shells when the need arises. If you maintain proper situational awareness and security at home, you will have plenty of time to make your shotgun ready if you need to. Finally, those two large diameter barrels are often intimidating enough to fix most problems without firing a shot.

There’s my 11th+ hour gun advice. As always you should check your local/state laws regarding self-defense, castle doctrine, reasonable force, duty to retreat, et al and consult a proper lawyer (not some Internet expert) if you have any serious legal questions.

REFERENCES
https://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/gun-shots/2013/08/twenty-plenty/

Police Scanners

There has been a fair amount of discussion, mostly private, regarding an earlier post on National Guard communications monitoring. Based upon the information received, National Guard units are using dedicated talkgroups on their state’s trunked radio system, old-fashioned analog FM the VHF-Low band frequency ranges of 40-42 & 46.6-47.0 MHz, and P25 on 380-400 MHz. So, lacking any other open source information to supplement this data, those are the frequency ranges I would concentrate on.

Now, being that solitary outside activity such as hiking is still considered an acceptable activity in most states during the Coronapocalypse . If I knew of a temporary installation set up somewhere, and there was an open space with hiking trails and few to no people within a 1/4-1/2 mile of said installation, I might go for a hike with a Spectrum Sweeper to see what I could hear. Google Maps is your friend.

Whistler TRX-2

Since states are getting on the trunked P25 bandwagon, it makes sense to get a scanner that has that capability as your first receiver acquisition. My recommendation would be either the Whistler TRX-1 or TRX-2. They are a handheld and desktop scanner, respectively, with P25 and trunking capability. Other than their different form factors, they are the same radio. Which one to get would depend on how you’re going to use it. The desktop has better ergonomics and audio, and if it was going to stay on a desk and never leave home I would go with the desktop version. If you are going to run it in your vehicle, go hiking with it, listen to it in the back yard while working on stuff, et al then get the portable.

Whistler TRX-1

03.31.20

Communications Monitoring During The COVID-19 Emergency – National Guard

Frequency Ranges, Spacing, and Modes

30-88 MHz., FM and FHSS (Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum), Usually 25 KHz. spacing, but can be as low as 5 KHz. Often encrypted. Unencrypted FM will have PL tone of 150 Hz. (Will decode as 151.4 Hz.) The usual frequencies in this range are:
30.000-30.550
32.000-33.000
36.000-37.000
38.000-39.000
40.000-42.000
46.600-47.000
49.600-50.000

138.000-144.000 MHz.
148.000-150.775 MHz.
AM (aircraft), FM, P25 Modes. Encryption possible, esp with P25

162.000-174.000 MHz.
Shared with other Federal agencies. FM and 25. Encryption possible.

225-380 MHz.
Military aviation (AM) and SATCOM (FM). FHSS and encryption possible.

380-400 MHz. – FM and P25. Possibly some aviation activity on AM. Encryption possible.

406-420 MHz. – Shared with other Federal agencies. FM and 25. Encryption possible.

Additionally you may see National Guard units on their state’s trunked radio system, interoperability, and DHS/OEM frequencies.

My initial advice would be to first sector search the listed sub-bands in the 30-88 MHz. spectrum, 138-144 MHz., and 148-150.775 MHz.

REFERENCE: https://lvassembly.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/consolidatedfreqs.pdf